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Yoga Teachers: Do You Have A Healthy Teaching Schedule?

There was a time when I was cycling all over Madrid, teaching 4 classes a day, 7 days a week. Was that a healthy teaching schedule? And if not, what does a healthy schedule look like that still gives you enough income? Here are some secrets to maintain good health and still have a nice income ; )

Those days of cycling all over town teaching 3 or more classes a day, 7 days a week are long gone. Since I became a mom I have a lot less time and teach about one or two classes 4 days a week. (next to running a yoga studio, but that’s a different post).

So I’ve experienced both a very mellow teaching schedule and one that left me exhausted.

Along the way I’ve figured out how to teach less and still earn enough, and here are 3 essentials for maintaining your wellbeing & financial health.

#1 Teach maximum 3 classes a day and have at least one day weekend.

The maximum amount of classes a teacher can deal with of course varies. But I’ve come to realise that after 3 classes, most yoga teachers have given all they have, but not to the point that they burn themselves out.

Three classes might sound like very little, but remember that during a yoga class, there’s a lot of energy exchange. Your students will probably release a lot of emotions they no longer need and meanwhile you need to be present for each second of the class. That’s very different from a seated desk job and requires a lot of mental & physical energy.

And while it’s tempting to work as much as you possibly can, a day off is very important to reset and just focus on other things than teaching. I feel that inspiration only comes from not working for a day (and taking a holiday every now & then!). So even though you feel this might be a waste of time, this is actually an investment in your work (and wellbeing).

#2 Have a mix of group & private classes

Let’s face it: group classes give very unsteady income. It totally depends on the amount of people joining and that again depends on so many factors. So private classes are a way to add some steady income to your week. Plus, private classes are usually booked by people who can’t join your regular classes, so it’s easy to plan them.

I usually schedule private classes in the early morning (at the moment around 2 times a week, but before I had one private class every week day). The evenings are available for group classes and the rest of the day you have time to practice a bit of yoga and do all the behind the scenes business stuff.

#3 Create bigger offerings that are ‘fed’ by your group & private classes

Teaching group and private classes brings a nice income, but it might not be enough to save any money. That’s why I think adding bigger offerings like workshops and retreats will bring you a bit of extra income that you can save or reinvest in your business or continuing education.

Plus these offerings will allow you to explore different ways of teaching and different topics.

But for people to join these, they first need to know your way of teaching. And this happens in your group & private classes. The yogis joining your classes will know what to expect and you can promote your offerings in class (which is still the best way if you ask me : ).

You can teach a monthly workshop and an annual retreat, so there’s consistency but you’re not adding too much work to your schedule.

There you have it: 3 essentials for creating a healthy yoga class schedule that brings a good income.

If you want more of these tips for your classes or business, join my bi-weekly teachers group call, where you get to meet and chat with other yoga teachers, create clarity in your work and solve challenges in your classes and business.

 

 

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